Government of Karnataka – The New Indian Express

Express press service

BENGALURU: The Karnataka government has stated that it has no plans to translate the MBBS books into the Kannada language. Dr. BL Sujatha Rathod, Director of Medical Education Directorate, Government of Karnataka, said that to date, the department has not received any guidelines or advice from the Department of Higher Education in this regard.

Madhya Pradesh became the first state in October to translate MBBS textbooks into Hindi. Many doctors called the government’s decision a regressive measure. They said if the state considered the proposal, it would reduce opportunities for aspiring doctors because they would be restricted to their own territory. Dr. Sanjeev Kumar of KC General Hospital said a student needs to understand many aspects while learning medicine, and it would be difficult to accurately translate every technical detail.

The Federation of All India Medical Associations (FAIMA) said that the medical curriculum is vast and constantly changing all over the world and hence it is best to study the course in a language that is universally spoken and understood. FAIMA noted that the current Hindi translations have problems and standardization of medical terms is their main concern.

BENGALURU: The Karnataka government has stated that it has no plans to translate the MBBS books into the Kannada language. Dr. BL Sujatha Rathod, Director of Medical Education Directorate, Government of Karnataka, said that to date, the department has not received any guidelines or advice from the Department of Higher Education in this regard. Madhya Pradesh became the first state in October to translate MBBS textbooks into Hindi. Many doctors called the government’s decision a regressive measure. They said if the state considered the proposal, it would reduce opportunities for aspiring doctors because they would be restricted to their own territory. Dr. Sanjeev Kumar of KC General Hospital said a student needs to understand many aspects while learning medicine, and it would be difficult to accurately translate every technical detail. The Federation of All India Medical Associations (FAIMA) said that the medical curriculum is vast and constantly changing all over the world and hence it is best to study the course in a language that is universally spoken and understood. FAIMA noted that the current Hindi translations have problems and standardization of medical terms is their main concern.

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